Tag: fertilizer

17 results found

Have a Bay Friendly Yard

Hiring a landscaper for 2018? Make sure they are being 'green' about it. Ask them to use a mulching mower so that the grass clippings can feed your lawn. That is the best food your lawn can have. Why have the clippings dumped in a landfill so that you have to throw expensive chemical fertilizers on it?

If you have pets or children, love nature and respect your neighbors, avoid pesticides. If you kill the bugs, you kill the soil. There will be fewer birds, amphibians. Pesticides also have a way of ending up in our drinking water and our bays, rivers and ponds. We are seeing a global collapse of insects, including the pollinators. Let's stop with the Roundup. There are natural ways of dealing with insects. Dragon flies, bats, and birds like Purple Martins are all voracious mosquito eaters. Take this route over Mosquito Squad. Your grandchildren will thank you.

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Sayville High School’s Freshman Class Chooses To Support “Save The Great South Bay”

Each year, each grade at Sayville High School chooses a cause or a non-profit to support. This year, the Freshmen of Sayville High School chose "Save The Great South Bay" as their non-profit. It was Doug Shaw, who teaches English at The High School and was born and raised in Sayville, who reached out to me via our Facebook Group to relay the good news. He told me "the kids were looking to do something really local."

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What Can I Do To Save The Great South Bay and All Long Island’s Waters?

There are literally millions of people on Long Island who do not know how to help, do not know what is causing our environmental crisis, do not know that every little action impairs our drinking water for future generations. I think I speak for my directors and a number of people in Save The Great South Bay -- call upon us, we will come. Ask us to meet you and your neighbors. We are there. We now have people independently offering to hold dinner parties so that they and their neighbors can learn more about this crucial issue and how they, locally and individually can help.

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An Open Letter to Steven Bellone: Thank You For Highlighting How Long Island is Under Threat From Ground Water Polluted by Septic Tanks

We of Save The Great South Bay applaud your leadership in helping to shine a light on the major issue threatening all of Long Island's bays, rivers, ponds, its very drinking water, and with that our way of life. With the release of The Comprehensive Water Resources Management Plan, the public at large, the 1.5 million people who live in Suffolk County and the 1.35 million in Nassau County, can begin to understand the collective threat we face from nitrogenous waste in our groundwater.

The public release of the report was truly a watershed moment. It was also a call to action. The now over 1100 members of Save The Great South Bay are ready to do their part to raise awareness about the threats our waters face, and to seek, in partnership with local officials and other environmental non-profits, solutions that would help preserve Long Island as a desirable place to live for our children and grandchildren.

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News12 What’s In The Water, Part II: How Much Is Too Much?

As per the segment, there are now over 100 pesticides found in our water, many of which were long since banned, but still traceable since they take time to decay. To go further, decayed pesticides often break down into compounds that are still harmful. Pat Dolan, President of News12 news interviewed a potato farmer out on The North Fork who balked at the notion of not using pesticides. The farmers fear that they will make less money without pesticides because they would have smaller crops. They'd favor any solution that didn't effect them economically.

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News12 to Air FIve Part Series on Long Island Water Quality — What’s In The Water (Sept 23rd through 27th)

This series -- which runs from Monday the 23rd of September to Friday the 27th with a one hour live special Thursday the 26th 7-8 -- is an admirable effort on the part of News12 and its President Pat Dolan, as well as all the scientists within The Long Island Clean Water Partnership and others to bring to light the challenges we face collectively as Long Islanders when it comes to assuring our water quality and our way of life for future generations. The problems are immense, but the solutions are there, if we decide, together on this island we call home, to take action. Our children and grandchild should also fish, swim, clam, and sail as we had, and Long Island should remain a place where people raise their families knowing the water is safe to drink and the environment is a healthy one. News12 understands the urgency, as does the 125+ organizations that make up The Long Island Partnership for Clean Water.

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The Long Island Clean Water Partnership Announced / What You Can Do

As New York continues to recover from Sandy and rebuilds, we are now also faced with a Long Island that is rapidly becoming unlivable due to nitrogenous waste in the ground water, the 117 pesticides in our drinking water, and the pharmaceuticals we throw away or flush down the toilet. The nitrogenous waste is from septic tanks and from lawn fertilizers, from the over 195 small sewage treatment plants scattered across the island, and from antiquated or crippled sewage treatment plants like the one in Bay Park, damaged severely by Sandy.

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How Can I Help Save Long Island’s Waters?

Start using lawn and agricultural fertilizers that are eco-friendly, that don't pollute our groundwater, drinking water and bays with excess nitrogen and phosphorus. The excess nitrogen has been contributing to brown tide, red tide, rust tide, red tide and blue green algae, and these have been killing our bays and in some cases rendering the water toxic. Click here to see what Nitrogen Free recommends for lawn care as they work to support Save Barnegat Bay. What ever bay we are speaking of, on Long Island or not, the issues are the same -- too much nitrogen in the groundwater from fertilizer and septic seepage leading to algal blooms and dying bays.

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The Breach Report July 11th — New Inlet Holding Off The Brown Tide, at Least In The Eastern Part of The Great South Bay (via SCERP)

The brown tide bloom in The Great South Bay is massive and its results will be devastating. The New Inlet will mitigate the damage somewhat -- we should be happy it wasn't closed after Sandy! -- but the real problem continues to be the 500,000 septic tanks in Nassau and Suffolk. Scientists are now speculating that the Babylon area was hit hard by this brown tide because the flow of polluted groundwater running into the bay was greatest there. While some of Babylon is on sewers, much of Babylon isn't. After an historically wet June -- we had twice the rain we usually did -- the ground water, now supersaturated, flowed towards the bay, drawing septic tank water with it. Babylon's rivers and streams contribute 30% of the ground water pollution into the bay, as measured by nitrogen content, as it is. A month of flooding rains, predictably, exacerbated the problem.

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