Tag: Great South Bay

Save The Great South Bay — A Year In Review, Episode One: Can A Beer Save A Bay?

As 2017 winds down, as the sun, ever lower on the horizon, yields the gorgeous sunrises and sunsets of The Great South Bay of Fall and Winter, while in our marinas our boats are stowed for the winter, we’ve time to reflect on what was a very eventful year.

GSB Sunset — Bellport. Courtesy, Mike Busch, Great South Bay Images

2017 started off with a great bit of news:   After years of work, Save The Great South Bay would at last have its own beer.   Mark Burford, Founder and Brewmaster Emeritus of Blue Point Brewery and Sayville Class of ’80 really stepped up.   He created Drink The Bay Clean, and got everyone behind it — marketing, retail, distribution — so that with every case of beer sold Save The Great South Bay receives $5, and for every keg $15.

The beer is ‘on pause’ until this April, until the opening of Blue Point’s new brewery in Patchogue.   If you can still find it locally, stock up!   Come the spring, the beer will be available at Nassau Coliseum and in New York City and beyond.   The proceeds will go to supporting our three main programs — The Creek Defender Program (here with special attention paid to The Patchogue River), The I Love Long Island Campaign for bay friendly yard care, and our Shellfish Restoration Program, which seeks to introduce filter feeders like oysters and ribbed mussels strategically by way of cleaning the bay and the creeks that feed into it.

Thanks to Blue Point, we really started 2017 with the wind at our back, and thanks to them, 2018 promises to be a great year as well, as we will have funds to address directly the issues our bay faces.    How often is a beer brewed for a cause?  Can a beer save a bay?

 

Can Long Island Be Saved, Part XIV: Video and Social Media as A Means of Building Public Awareness (HuffPo)

If Long Island is to be saved, and by “saved” I mean preserved as a desirable place to live for future generations, then everybody in Nassau and Suffolk needs to understand why our drinking water and all our rivers, ponds and bays are imperiled. Lets begin with the premise that if people really understand the problems, and what is at stake, they will do the sensible thing and do what is necessary to protect and restore Long Island’s estuarine and marine environments.

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Route It South — Bring Sewering To Low Lying Areas Near The Great South Bay, and Maybe Bring Back Oystering

DID YOU KNOW THAT THOUSANDS UPON THOUSANDS OF CESSPOOLS AND SEPTIC TANKS ARE SEEPING NITROGREN INTO OUR GREAT SOUTH BAY…?

 

THAT NITROGEN HAS ALL BUT WIPED OUT OUR SHELLFISHING INDUSTRY BY TRIGGERING MASSIVE ALGAL BLOOMS.

 

IF WE CAN REPLACE THE CESSPOOLS CLOSE TO THE BAY WITH SEWERS, WE CAN GET THE WATER CLEAN ENOUGH TO BRING BACK CLAMMING AND OYSTERING, AND REVIVE A $500 MILLION INDUSTRY.

 

GIVE THE CLAMS AND OYSTERS A CHANCE, AND, AS FILTER FEEDERS, THEY WILL HELP TO CLEAN THE WATER WHILE BRINGING PROSPERITY TO THE SOUTH SHORE, AND RESTORING A WAY OF LIFE.

 

$383 MILLION DOLLARS HAS ALREADY BEEN ALLOCATED TO SEWER ALONG FOUR MAJOR RIVERS EMPTYING INTO THE GREAT SOUTH BAY.

 

WE SAY ‘LET’S PUT THAT MONEY TO WORK SO THAT WE AND THE SHELLFISH CAN GET TO WORK.’

 

THE RONKONKOMA HUB, A LARGE SCALE PROJECT JUST NOW BREAKING GROUND, NEEDS A ROUTE TO THE BERGEN SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANT.

 

WE ARE PETITIONING THE COUNTY TO ‘ROUTE IT SOUTH’ THROUGH SAYVILLE, WEST SAYVILLE, AND OAKDALE, SO THAT WE CAN REPLACE THE LOW LYING CESSPOOLS CLOSE TO THE SHORE. YES, IT WILL COST MORE THAN WHAT WAS INITIALLY PLANNED, AROUND $24 MILLION MORE. BUT LET’S LOOK AT THE RETURN ON INVESTMENT.

 

WE COULD OPEN UP THOUSANDS OF ACRES TO SHELLFISHING AGAIN, AND WITH EVERY ACRE OF OYSTERS GENERATING UP TO $100,000 A YEAR IN REVENUES, EVERYONE WINS, ESPECIALLY THE BAY. 

 

WE URGE YOU THEN: SIGN THE PETITION.

 

VOTE YES ON THIS PLAN TO CLEAN OUR WATERS. VOTE YES ON THIS ECONOMIC INVESTMENT. YOUR LOCAL OFFICIALS NEED TO HEAR YOUR VOICE, AND THIS PLAN NEEDS A FAIR HEARING.

 

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Water Matters — Episode 6. Enrico Nardone, Executive Director of The Seatuck Environmental Association

Enrico Nardone of Seatuck will present on the diadromous and anadromous fish of Long Island, and how they are an essential part of the the food chain for seals, whales, river otters, gulls, bluefish, stripers, and other larger predators. Alewives, herring, and eels are migratory fish that live part time in fresh water, part time in salt water. For them and the ecosystem to thrive, we need to restore our streams, creeks and rivers, so that these fish can pass freely up and down stream once more. This would involve fish ladders and even dam removal.

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Learn Oyster Gardening — And Help Rebuild A Way of Life

A class to teach young people the art of oyster growing is about to begin in Islip at Great Atlantic Shellfish Farms. Register now! Create your own oyster garden. Learn the art of oyster cultivation, and maybe someday become a bayman. That would help to bring an industry -- and a bay back!

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