Tag: Long Island Clean Water Partnership

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Can Long Island Be Saved? Part VII — Now It’s Up To Albany To Pass The Long Island Water Quality Control Act

More recent data indicates that the rate of nitrogen infiltration into our drinking water has accelerated since 2005. At the same time, algal blooms have been increasing in intensity and variety and geographic distribution over the same period. The nitrogen seeping into our groundwater from septic tanks and fertilizers -- 500,000 septic tanks and from perhaps as many lawns, as well as farms has been driving these highly destructive blooms.

Beyond that, our waters show increased amounts of pesticides (117 have been detected in our ground water), pharmaceuticals (because we have a bad habit of flushing them down the toilet instead of properly disposing them) and volatile chemicals, both via industrial pollution and the improper disposal of household paints, solvents, glues and other hazardous waste.

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An Open Letter to Steven Bellone: Thank You For Highlighting How Long Island is Under Threat From Ground Water Polluted by Septic Tanks

We of Save The Great South Bay applaud your leadership in helping to shine a light on the major issue threatening all of Long Island's bays, rivers, ponds, its very drinking water, and with that our way of life. With the release of The Comprehensive Water Resources Management Plan, the public at large, the 1.5 million people who live in Suffolk County and the 1.35 million in Nassau County, can begin to understand the collective threat we face from nitrogenous waste in our groundwater.

The public release of the report was truly a watershed moment. It was also a call to action. The now over 1100 members of Save The Great South Bay are ready to do their part to raise awareness about the threats our waters face, and to seek, in partnership with local officials and other environmental non-profits, solutions that would help preserve Long Island as a desirable place to live for our children and grandchildren.

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News12 What’s In The Water, Part II: How Much Is Too Much?

As per the segment, there are now over 100 pesticides found in our water, many of which were long since banned, but still traceable since they take time to decay. To go further, decayed pesticides often break down into compounds that are still harmful. Pat Dolan, President of News12 news interviewed a potato farmer out on The North Fork who balked at the notion of not using pesticides. The farmers fear that they will make less money without pesticides because they would have smaller crops. They'd favor any solution that didn't effect them economically.

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