Tag: nitrogen

26 results found

The Septic Tanks of The Future Being Piloted Throughout Suffolk — Faster, Better and Cheaper

The on-site system I saw installed by Tom Montalbine of Roman Stone Construction Company in Bayshore stated that in volume the Norweco Singulair could reach $12000 per, and that is with all the manufacture being done on Long Island.   We are as a county on a mission to bring the very best in waste water treatment technology to Stony Brook's Clean Business Incubator Program and to the world.   

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What Can I Do To Save The Great South Bay and All Long Island’s Waters?

There are literally millions of people on Long Island who do not know how to help, do not know what is causing our environmental crisis, do not know that every little action impairs our drinking water for future generations. I think I speak for my directors and a number of people in Save The Great South Bay -- call upon us, we will come. Ask us to meet you and your neighbors. We are there. We now have people independently offering to hold dinner parties so that they and their neighbors can learn more about this crucial issue and how they, locally and individually can help.

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Can LI Be Saved? VIII – IBM Offers Roadmap to A Sustainable Future for LI While in Albany Its Business As Usual

As the bill in Albany died, a plan on Long Island was born. Now it is truly up to Governor Cuomo's 'task force' on Water Quality and Coastal Resiliency to hold the last of its four public meetings and offer its recommendations. Will Governor Cuomo have the vision and drive to move past the Albany nonsense to protect and restore the water sole source supply of drinking water for 3 million Long islanders, and the $5 billion dollar per year cash cow coastal economy of New York State? Will Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone step up and make the sweeping agency reforms recommended by the expert panel from IBM Smarter Cities Program? If so - then best of times indeed. Between IBM and the many dozens of experts in consultation now on water quality issues, we have the very best science in the world at hand to address our problems. We need to leverage this fact. "We have to."

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Can Long Island Be Saved, Part V: Cuomo’s Initiative to Improve Water Quality and Coastal Resilience

he die offs of vegetation (marshes, eel grass, sea grass) and wildlife (fish, shellfish, birds, insects, amphibians and reptiles) have been stunning. Whole habitats are vanishing before our eyes. At the same time, that nitrogen is seeping ever more deeply into our drinking water into the aquifer that sits below us, with water deposited there by glacier melt eons ago.

Not only are nitrogen rates rising, but the rate of the rise is too, as the plume of nitrogen created by the explosive population growth on Post War Long Island, much unsewered, has generated a plume of nitrogen that is now making its way downward into our drinking water.

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Can Long Island Be Saved? Part II — Public Forum on Water Quality and Resiliency May 12th, Theodore Roosevelt Executive Offices

The first of four public meetings scheduled this month on Long Island's water quality crisis was held Monday, May 12, 12-4 p.m. in the Nassau County Legislative Chambers which are appropriately enough in the Theodore Roosevelt Executive Office Building at 1550 Franklin Avenue, Mineola. The next meeting will be at Stony Brook University May 19, time and place TBD.

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Can Long Island Be Saved? Part I

The numbers are staggering – 500,000 septic tanks on Long Island. An estimated 2000 outfall pipes pouring runoff into our lakes, streams and bays with each rain. 100+ small dams and spillways blocking the way for ocean fish that would otherwise spawn. Clam harvests in the Great South Bay down well over 90 percent. Scallops in Peconic Bay all but wiped out by rust tide. Fish populations a small fraction of what they were not too long ago.

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A Late Earth Day Present From Governor Cuomo — An Initiative to Improve Water Quality and Resiliency on Long Island

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced that New York will undertake an intensive and collaborative review of clean water needs in Nassau and Suffolk counties to increase resiliency against future storms, improve water quality and provide additional protections for Long Island’s groundwater resources. This review will be undertaken in a series of meetings in conjunction with Nassau County Executive Ed Mangano and Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone and with additional participation from federal officials and key community, business and environmental stakeholders. Following the review, recommendations will be provided to the Governor for immediate action.

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The Suffolk County Comprehensive Water Resources Management Plan — The Anatomy of a Crisis For Long Island

So what will the county do? What will Long Island do? Clearly, it will take billions to address the septic tank issue. That's where the IBM Smarter Cities award will come in handy. Suffolk County won $500,000 worth of consulting from IBM to study the issue of sewer and waste water treatment planning. Rest assured, when it comes time to remove and replace the 100,000 septic tanks with something green, they will have a full, complete and accurate inventory, and a process. Beyond that, everyone -- the governor, our senators -- agree that we need sewer systems and modern waste water treatment technology and the funding to make that possible.

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When It Comes To Long Island’s Ground Water Pollution Problem, The Facts Are Now Speaking For Themselves

Ever since the release of The Comprehensive Water Resources Management Plan, January 23, 2014, County Executive Steve Bellone has been on a mission to focus attention on the need to address our septic tank and water quality issues. He kicked off matters with a 9500 person conference call on water quality in. He has since then called for funding and for extending sewer districts. Most recently, Suffolk County won an IBM Smarter Cities Award, which will be used to study how best to address the septic tank issue in the county. Bellone worked with Senator Gillibrand to advocate for this. We are thankful to both for working on behalf of Long Island.

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10-7-13 Save The Date: Toxic Tides, Pesticides and Sewage Oh My! A Water Worries Community Forum From The Citizens Campaign For The Environment

Scientists have determined that increasing pollution from sewage, pesticides, and toxic chemicals threatens Long Island’s water. Aging sewer and septic systems leak nitrogen into our underground supply of fresh drinking water, which flows into our creeks, bays, and harbors. This leads to “red tides” and other environmental problems that choke sea life, kill fish, and poison shellfish that people eat.

Fortunately, we can fix it. Citizens Campaign for the Environment, Group for the East End, Long Island Pine Barrens Society, and The Nature Conservancy have been working together for over a year to form the Long Island Clean Water Partnership—a grassroots initiative to restore and protect Long Island’s water resources on a comprehensive level. But action by local, county, and state officials is needed right now if Long Island’s water quality is to be protected and restored for our children and grandchildren. We all have good reason to make sure our water supply is clean and healthy, and we each have a part to play in protecting it for the future.

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Via SCERP: HIGH LEVELS OF NITROGEN PROMOTE RUST TIDES ON LONG ISLAND

August 27th 2013 – Last week, Rust tides caused by the dinoflagellate, Cochlodinium, emerged on eastern Long Island and have since spread east through the Peconic Estuary and Shinnecock Bay. A recent study performed more than two dozen experiments over a four year period in five different Long Island estuaries and found that the loading of nitrogen during significantly increased the growth of Cochlodinium relative to other phytoplankton groups, demonstrating that nitrogen promotes rust tides (1; see figure). In south shore bays, the primary source of nitrogen is septic tanks (2). Recent investigations of the Peconic Estuary found that septic tanks, cesspools, and fertilizers were all important nitrogen sources (3).

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