Tag: NYSDEC

7 results found

Engineer Approved Drainage Plans Threaten Sensitive Natural Habitat In Long Island’s North Fork

There must be a stop work order issued immediately on this "enhancement" project. The North Fork Nature Preserve is about to be ravaged by a major excavation project that would establish a series of retention ponds, thus ruining the hydrology of a good portion of this county park. This project is being undertaken for the benefit of a few home owners who built on The Sound who take exception to water from the preserve flowing through their beach. How did this ever get approved with no environmental impact analysis? This must not stand.

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Cleaning Our Polluted Waters With Oysters — A Bill Awaits Governor Christie’s Signature. What of New York?

We need to be able to use oysters as a means of cleaning up the polluted water in our bays. The science and the economics argues strongly for this. We just need to grow those oysters in places where people will not be able to poach them. The big fear is that oysters taken from uncertified waters getting people sick would severely impact the local oyster industry. New Jersey is changing their law. New York needs to as well.

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A Water Quality Crisis On Long Island — Brown Tide, Beach Closings; Baykeeper Brings Law Suits Against New York State and The Federal Government

With over 500,000 septic tanks on Long Island, we have a monumental water quality problem on our hands. With a further 180 local small scale sewage treatment plants on Long Island, the problem gets worse. With antiquated large scale treatment facilities further polluting our bays, chief among them The Bay Park Sewage Treatment Plant, crippled by Sandy and spewing millions upon millions of gallons of semi-treated sewage into the Western Bays, we have a disaster of monumental proportions on our hands, yet the issue is vastly under reported, and both the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation and the EPA are failing to address the issue, refusing, it seems, to enforce the laws already on the books, specifically The Clean Water Act.

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The Breach Report — June 30th, 2013 — The REAL Breach Report From Prof. Charles Flagg, Prof Roger Flood, and SoMAS

has been monitoring the breach since Sandy, measuring tides, as well as the depth and breadth of The Breach/New Inlet on a monthly basis. Here then is their June 28th report, which presents what the current conditions are there, comparing them to how they were over the past 7 months. This regular analysis is crucial, since there will be some decision taken on the fate of The Breach / New Inlet soon. Whatever decision the NYSDEC makes needs to be based on science, rather than politics. Is the breach getting bigger? Is it at all increasing the likelihood / intensity of flooding on The Great South Bay? And what of the benefits? What does this influx of clean ocean water mean for The Great South Bay and the towns of The South Shore?

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Shellfish Bed Closings Throughout Long Island — Again, and Thoroughly Predictable Because Our Ground Water is Filthy With Septic Tank Seepage, Lawn Fertilizer and Storm Run Off

1. Towns of Hempstead and Oyster Bay (south shore): All that area of Hempstead Bay, East Bay and South Oyster Bay and their tributaries.

2. Town of North Hempstead: All that area of Hempstead Harbor lying southerly of a line extending northeasterly from Prospect Point to Matinecock Point.

3. Town of Oyster Bay (north shore): All of Hempstead Harbor, Oyster Bay Harbor and all of Cold Spring Harbor lying southerly of a line extending easterly from the stone house on Plum Point (Centre Island) to the northerly side of the beach pavilion at West Neck Beach (Town of Huntington) on the eastern shore of Cold Spring Harbor.

4. Towns of Babylon and Islip: All that area of Great South Bay and its tributaries lying westerly of the northbound span of the Robert Moses Twin Causeway bridges.

5. Towns of Islip and Brookhaven (south shore): All that area of northern Great South Bay, including Nicoll Bay and Patchogue Bay, lying northerly of a line* extending easterly from the southern base of the northbound span of the Robert Moses Causeway (north side of Captree Island) to Buoy R "6" Fl R 4s (West Channel) to Buoy R "4" Fl R 2.5s (south of Nicoll Point) to Buoy GR "EN" Fl (2+1) G 6s (Nicoll Bay) to Buoy R N "30" (south of Green Point) through Buoys R N "32", R "34" FL R 2.5s and G "35" Fl G 4s (south of Blue Point) to Buoy R A36" Fl R 6s (south of Swan River) to Buoy G C A37" to Buoy G "1" Fl G 2.5s (south of Howells Point) thence proceeding southeasterly from buoy G "1" Fl G 2.5s to the flag tower at Bellport Beach (located on the barrier beach, Fire Island). (*Also known as the East-West Buoy Line)

6. Town of Brookhaven (south shore): All of Bellport Bay lying easterly of a line extending southerly from Howells Point through Buoy G "1" Fl G 2.5s, thence proceeding southeasterly to the flag tower at Bellport Beach; and, all of Moriches Bay and its tributaries.

7. Town of Brookhaven (north shore): All of Stony Brook Harbor, Port Jefferson Harbor and Mount Sinai Harbor.

8. Town of Huntington: All of Northport Bay, Duck Island Harbor, Centerport Harbor, Lloyd Harbor; and, all that area of Huntington Bay lying southerly of a line extending easterly from the southernmost point of East Beach (at the north side of the mouth of Lloyd Harbor) to the southernmost point of West Beach (the southern tip of Sand City beach); AND, all that area of Cold Spring Harbor, lying southerly of a line extending easterly from the stone house on Plum Point (Centre Island) to the northerly side of the beach pavilion at the Town of Huntington West Neck Beach on the eastern shore of Cold Spring Harbor.

9. Town of Smithtown: All that area of Stony Brook Harbor and its tributaries.

10. Town of Riverhead: All that area of Flanders Bay and its tributaries.

11. Town of Southampton: All that area of Flanders Bay, Moriches Bay, Quantuck Bay, Quantuck Canal and Shinnecock Bay and all other creeks, bay, harbors, coves and tributaries within the Town of Southampton.

12. Town of East Hampton: All that area of Northwest Harbor, Three Mile Harbor, Accabonac Harbor, Napeague Harbor, Lake Montauk and all other creeks, bay, harbors, coves and tributaries within the Town of East Hampton.

13. Town of Shelter Island: All that area of Coecles Harbor, Dering Harbor, West Neck Harbor, Northwest Harbor and all the creeks, bay, harbors, coves and tributaries within the Town of Shelter Island.

14. Town of Southold: All that area of Cutchogue Harbor, Pipes Cove, Orient Harbor, Hallock (Long Beach) Bay, Hay Harbor, West Harbor and East Harbor on Fishers Island; and, all other creeks, bay, harbors, coves and tributaries within the Town of Southold.

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The Environmental Defense Fund Weighs In On The Legality of Closing The Old Inlet / Breach

Last month, Jim Tripp of the The Environmental Defense Fund drafted a letter addressed to The Department of Interior, The National Parks Service, The Fire Island National Seashore, The Army Corps of Engineers, and The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. In it, he argues that The Breach Contingency Plan, adopted in 1996, extended in 2001 for another five years, then on the books but overdue for revision since 2007, must be interpreted in light of previous documents pertaining to the protection of wilderness areas, and that before any action is taken to close The Old Inlet, the following would by law have to happen:

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