Tag: septic tanks

39 results found

Is Long Island At A Turning Point Re: Nitrogen Pollution?

Long Island is about to replace its cesspools and septic tanks. Nassau County has 140,000, Suffolk 360,000. Suffolk intends to launch a pilot program that will deploy 400 units over the next two years. Albany is chipping in with $2 billion to address the issue at scale. Yet more will be needed, but everyone, seeing the problem, is stepping up. At the same time that we do this, we need to stop polluting our waters with lawn fertilizer and pesticides.

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LINAP: Is Long Island At a Turning Point?

Long Island is about to replace its cesspools and septic tanks. Nassau County has 140,000, Suffolk 360,000. Suffolk intends to launch a pilot program that will deploy 400 units over the next two years. Albany is chipping in with $2 billion to address the issue at scale. Yet more will be needed, but everyone, seeing the problem, is stepping up. At the same time that we do this, we need to stop polluting our waters with lawn fertilizer and pesticides.

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A Pledge To Help Build A Sustainable Long Island Taken at The Aspen Action Forum

The video here is from last year's Action Forum, where I offer an update from 2013. Membership in the Save The Great South Bay Facebook Group had tripled to over 1700. A consortium called The Long Island Clean Water Partnership had formed, comprised of over 100 organizations. Somehow, people on the local, state and federal level got on the same page, prodded by the science. Similarly, local reporting on Long Island's environmental issues, especially around water quality, really came around. Increasingly, Long Islanders are becoming aware of the challenges our waters face.

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Can Long Island Be Saved? Part IX — The Following Beaches Will Be Closed This Weekend…

This what happens on Long Island in the warm months every time it rains. And it gets worse by the year. Before 1984, we did not have algal blooms around Long Island. Headlong development has caught up with us. What led us to think that we could put 500,000 septic tanks / cesspools in the low lying sand of Long Island and not suffer some consequences? That said, we had no definitive scientific link between nitrogen from our septic tanks and the explosion of algal blooms now threatening almost all our waters until 2005.

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Can LI Be Saved? VIII – IBM Offers Roadmap to A Sustainable Future for LI While in Albany Its Business As Usual

As the bill in Albany died, a plan on Long Island was born. Now it is truly up to Governor Cuomo's 'task force' on Water Quality and Coastal Resiliency to hold the last of its four public meetings and offer its recommendations. Will Governor Cuomo have the vision and drive to move past the Albany nonsense to protect and restore the water sole source supply of drinking water for 3 million Long islanders, and the $5 billion dollar per year cash cow coastal economy of New York State? Will Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone step up and make the sweeping agency reforms recommended by the expert panel from IBM Smarter Cities Program? If so - then best of times indeed. Between IBM and the many dozens of experts in consultation now on water quality issues, we have the very best science in the world at hand to address our problems. We need to leverage this fact. "We have to."

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Can Long Island Be Saved? Part VI – An Interview With Professor Christopher Gobler

Chris and his team helped link septic tank seepage to the nitrogen fueled algal blooms around Long Island. Today, we know that we need to deal with the 500,000 septic tanks on Long Island if we are to save our bays, rivers, ponds, and marshes, and preserve our drinking water. Today, as various scientific experts and public officials grapple, along with our environmental non profits and the public with the question of how we address our water quality issues, Gobler's work is essential in charting the right path.

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Can Long Island Be Saved? Part IV — Crescent Beach, Beach Closures and Cesspools

Crescent Beach is a microcosm, an all too familiar story. There are 500,000 septic systems and cesspools in Nassau (140K) and Suffolk (360K). Along the North Shore of Nassau County, in places like Manhasset, Bayville, Glen Cove, and Oyster Bay, in Kings Point, in thirty communities total, marshland has all but vanished and the waters become unswimmable because of the nitrogen and bacteria leeching from these low lying tanks and cesspools.

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Can Long Island Be Saved, Part III — An Interview With Carl LoBue of The Nature Conservancy

We knew that if The Great South Bay was to be saved, it was going to have to be through bringing science to the problem. The people of The South Shore of Long Island needed to understand what the issues with the bay were, what was causing them, and what solutions were possible.

A couple of calls pointed me in Carl's direction, and soon he was sharing his knowledge and passion with the group, and helping us to understand what it would take to achieve our mission - to bring back the shellfish, the fish, the eelgrass, the marshes, the habitats that decades of neglect and decay had all but removed.

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Can Long Island Be Saved? Part I

The numbers are staggering – 500,000 septic tanks on Long Island. An estimated 2000 outfall pipes pouring runoff into our lakes, streams and bays with each rain. 100+ small dams and spillways blocking the way for ocean fish that would otherwise spawn. Clam harvests in the Great South Bay down well over 90 percent. Scallops in Peconic Bay all but wiped out by rust tide. Fish populations a small fraction of what they were not too long ago.

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