Tag: SoMAS

17 results found

Can Long Island Be Saved? Part VI – An Interview With Professor Christopher Gobler

Chris and his team helped link septic tank seepage to the nitrogen fueled algal blooms around Long Island. Today, we know that we need to deal with the 500,000 septic tanks on Long Island if we are to save our bays, rivers, ponds, and marshes, and preserve our drinking water. Today, as various scientific experts and public officials grapple, along with our environmental non profits and the public with the question of how we address our water quality issues, Gobler's work is essential in charting the right path.

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A Breach of Protocol? Outdated Science Supporting Bureaucratic Decision Making on The Breach

Many of us (about 35 based on RSVPs, seeing people there) attended "Sandy's Silver Lining," A Public Forum on The Breach, held at Bellport Middle School on the 21st between 9:30 - 12:00. The response was strong even though it was the last shopping weekend before Christmas; this issue is still front and center for us, and so about 200 showed in total. Thomas Bruckner should be singled out as having done a marvelous job assembling the panel, and in the presentation, with informative segues between speakers where he showed pics and video from his some 30 trips to the breach / inlet. He's a natural MC. The sound system was out of whack, but we will get this fixed for next time, for yes, there will be next times, as what Commissioner Soller had to say make clear.

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Sandy’s Silver Lining — A Panel Discussion and Public Forum on The Breach December 21st 9:30 at Bellport Middle School

Come to Bellport Middle School 35 Kreamer Street on Saturday December 21st between 9:30 and 12:00 and hear how the breach has helped change Bellport Bay. A panel of scientific experts will discuss changes in water quality and clarity, and how here at least The Great South Bay has begun to rebound, with fish, shellfish and eelgrass making a local comeback. Questions from the public welcome.

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The Latest Report From SOMAS and Professor Charles Flagg On The State of The Breach / New Inlet / Old Inlet On Fire Island South of Bellport Bay

This report, their tenth, available here Inlet_Report_10 in its entirety, discusses both how the breach has evolved and mutated, while remaining stable over all in terms of its flow and its influence on water quality in The Great South Bay. Bellport Bay -- and not much more than that -- continues to benefit greatly from the influx of fresh clean ocean water and the outflow of nitrogen rich, oxygen depleted water.

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Breach Report 9-19-13: WSJ On The Breach: “The Kindest Cut of All”

Fishermen and scientists report cleaner water and more marine life in the Great South Bay since superstorm Sandy blasted a new inlet across Fire Island, the slender land barrier that separates the Long Island bay from the Atlantic Ocean.

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What Caused The Brown Tide in The Great South Bay in 2013? SCERP Has The Answer in One Graphic

The outbreak of the brown tide caused by Aureococcus in Great South Bay during late June and early July came as a surprise to citizens and scientists alike as it ended nearly eight months of what some had deemed “gin-clear” water facilitated in part by the new ocean inlet created by Hurricane Sandy. An analysis of environmental data (see accompanying graphic; salinity and chlorophyll data courtesy of Dr. C. Flagg) during June provides some clear signs as to the cause of this brown tide.

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The Breach Report — June 30th, 2013 — The REAL Breach Report From Prof. Charles Flagg, Prof Roger Flood, and SoMAS

has been monitoring the breach since Sandy, measuring tides, as well as the depth and breadth of The Breach/New Inlet on a monthly basis. Here then is their June 28th report, which presents what the current conditions are there, comparing them to how they were over the past 7 months. This regular analysis is crucial, since there will be some decision taken on the fate of The Breach / New Inlet soon. Whatever decision the NYSDEC makes needs to be based on science, rather than politics. Is the breach getting bigger? Is it at all increasing the likelihood / intensity of flooding on The Great South Bay? And what of the benefits? What does this influx of clean ocean water mean for The Great South Bay and the towns of The South Shore?

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Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning Throughout LI This May — Bad and Worse To Come?

The conclusions from SCERP (The Stonybrook Southampton Estuarine Research Program) are clear. We are reaping the harvest of having no sewer system in Suffolk, and 100,000+ septic tanks leeching nitrogen into the groundwater for the past 40 years. All indicator are this is going to get much much worse unless we can figure out how to get all that excess nitrogen out of the aquifer, and out of our rivers, ponds and bays, and replace our septic tanks with an eco friendly solution. We need to think big and be ready to act on those plans, or its game over.

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Professor Christopher Gobler of Stonybrook’s School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences: A Profile

Here's a nice piece on Prof. Christopher Gobler of Stonybrook's School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS). You want to know about toxic algal blooms, what they are doing to the marine plants and animals in our ponds and bays, and what we can do to combat them, he's the expert. His lectures, which we hope to post here as well soon, are very accessible, yet highly sophisticated.

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