Tag: Steven Bellone

14 results found

Suffolk County, Thwarted Once, Seeks to Raid $30 Million in Environmental Funding Again

Chalk one up for the environmentalists. EXCEPT now the County is looking to raid $30 million dollars in funds meant for land protection, which plays a crucial part in our efforts to protect our drinking water. As we live on top of our drinking water, with Long Island as a 'sole source aquifer,' we must preserve our open spaces, that is those few we have left.

Not surprisingly, Suffolk County and the Legislature did not give us much notice to act. They are after all looking to gut another environmental fund to pay for the fact that they couldn't gut the first. The budget votes are Tuesday, Oct 7th.

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Can Long Island Be Saved? Part X — It’s a CrapSHOOT! You Can Be Part of Save The Great South Bay’s Winning Environmental Video!

As an organization, we need to have our say. Here then is Save The Great South Bay's plan to win the contest: We call on all members of Save The Great South Bay and supporters to our cause to submit a video of six seconds or less on the topic of water quality/ what they love about the Great South Bay/ what needs to be done to fix it (see general guidelines below) and either email them to [email protected], or post them at either our Facebook Page Save The Great South Bay, or if you are a member at our Facebook Group Page, or send them via the contact form at the bottom of this event posting as soon as you can, ideally by SEPTEMBER 12TH. The contest ends Sept 15th and we will need a couple of days beforehand to edit together all the clips into 1-3 minute videos for submission on YouTube for the contest. With over 1700 members in the group, we could crowdsource something special.

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Can Long Island Be Saved? Part X — It’s a CrapSHOOT! You Can Be Part of Save The Great South Bay’s Winning Environmental Video!

As an organization, we need to have our say. Here then is Save The Great South Bay's plan to win the contest: We call on all members of Save The Great South Bay and supporters to our cause to submit a video of six seconds or less on the topic of water quality/ what they love about the Great South Bay/ what needs to be done to fix it (see general guidelines below) and either email them to [email protected], or post them at either our Facebook Page Save The Great South Bay, or if you are a member at our Facebook Group Page, or send them via the contact form at the bottom of this event posting as soon as you can, ideally by SEPTEMBER 12TH. The contest ends Sept 15th and we will need a couple of days beforehand to edit together all the clips into 1-3 minute videos for submission on YouTube for the contest. With over 1700 members in the group, we could crowdsource something special.

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Can Long Island Be Saved? Part VII — Now It’s Up To Albany To Pass The Long Island Water Quality Control Act

More recent data indicates that the rate of nitrogen infiltration into our drinking water has accelerated since 2005. At the same time, algal blooms have been increasing in intensity and variety and geographic distribution over the same period. The nitrogen seeping into our groundwater from septic tanks and fertilizers -- 500,000 septic tanks and from perhaps as many lawns, as well as farms has been driving these highly destructive blooms.

Beyond that, our waters show increased amounts of pesticides (117 have been detected in our ground water), pharmaceuticals (because we have a bad habit of flushing them down the toilet instead of properly disposing them) and volatile chemicals, both via industrial pollution and the improper disposal of household paints, solvents, glues and other hazardous waste.

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Can Long Island Be Saved? Part I

The numbers are staggering – 500,000 septic tanks on Long Island. An estimated 2000 outfall pipes pouring runoff into our lakes, streams and bays with each rain. 100+ small dams and spillways blocking the way for ocean fish that would otherwise spawn. Clam harvests in the Great South Bay down well over 90 percent. Scallops in Peconic Bay all but wiped out by rust tide. Fish populations a small fraction of what they were not too long ago.

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The Suffolk County Comprehensive Water Resources Management Plan — The Anatomy of a Crisis For Long Island

So what will the county do? What will Long Island do? Clearly, it will take billions to address the septic tank issue. That's where the IBM Smarter Cities award will come in handy. Suffolk County won $500,000 worth of consulting from IBM to study the issue of sewer and waste water treatment planning. Rest assured, when it comes time to remove and replace the 100,000 septic tanks with something green, they will have a full, complete and accurate inventory, and a process. Beyond that, everyone -- the governor, our senators -- agree that we need sewer systems and modern waste water treatment technology and the funding to make that possible.

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An Open Letter to Steven Bellone: Thank You For Highlighting How Long Island is Under Threat From Ground Water Polluted by Septic Tanks

We of Save The Great South Bay applaud your leadership in helping to shine a light on the major issue threatening all of Long Island's bays, rivers, ponds, its very drinking water, and with that our way of life. With the release of The Comprehensive Water Resources Management Plan, the public at large, the 1.5 million people who live in Suffolk County and the 1.35 million in Nassau County, can begin to understand the collective threat we face from nitrogenous waste in our groundwater.

The public release of the report was truly a watershed moment. It was also a call to action. The now over 1100 members of Save The Great South Bay are ready to do their part to raise awareness about the threats our waters face, and to seek, in partnership with local officials and other environmental non-profits, solutions that would help preserve Long Island as a desirable place to live for our children and grandchildren.

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New York Seagrant Weighs In On The Breach and The Crippling of The Bay Park Sewage Treatment Plant — Both Caused By Hurricane Sandy

Seagrant ( a lot more on them below, from their site), offers an overview of the two most important topics affecting The Great South Bay and the Western Bays -- The Breach / New Inlet, and The Crippling of The Bay Park Sewage Treatment Plant By Hurricane Sandy. Here is a national marine science non-profit with a strong local presence offering their views on both these issues as part of a Post Sandy assessment of marine conditions post Sandy and what our policy should be regarding them. One's a story of dirty water being flushed out (The Breach), the other a story of dirty water pouring in (The crippled Bay Park Sewage Treatment Plant). In both cases, it is crucial that as we rebuild we make wise, informed choices. As the Breach / New Inlet is flushing the Eastern Great South Bay while revitalizing it and lowering the brown algae count to perhaps 1/100th of what we are seeing in Moriches and Shinnecock Bay, we need to keep The New Inlet open -- or to put it another way, prevent it from being closed through political pressure.

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What Mother Nature and The New Inlet Can’t Do — A Bay in Peril

With The New Inlet, Mother Nature's true gift was to give us but a glimpse of what the Great South Bay was and could be again. It's a challenge to us to take action. Next summer, will The New Inlet even be there, whether because of nature or man? Then what? The bay starts to die again. Here's what Mother Nature alone can't fix, and what we must fix if we want this bay all the way back, New Inlet or no New Inlet:

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