Tag: Suffolk County

42 results found

A Referendum On Long Island’s Future

Suffolk County will have a referendum on The Water Quality Protection Fee on the ballot this November. For an average of $73 dollars per family of 4 per year, we can have the funds necessary to address in a large scale way the nitrogen pollution issues threatening our bays, rivers, and ponds, our drinking water, and indeed our way of life as "Islanders."

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Suffolk County, Thwarted Once, Seeks to Raid $30 Million in Environmental Funding Again

Chalk one up for the environmentalists. EXCEPT now the County is looking to raid $30 million dollars in funds meant for land protection, which plays a crucial part in our efforts to protect our drinking water. As we live on top of our drinking water, with Long Island as a 'sole source aquifer,' we must preserve our open spaces, that is those few we have left.

Not surprisingly, Suffolk County and the Legislature did not give us much notice to act. They are after all looking to gut another environmental fund to pay for the fact that they couldn't gut the first. The budget votes are Tuesday, Oct 7th.

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Can Long Island Be Saved? Part X — It’s a CrapSHOOT! You Can Be Part of Save The Great South Bay’s Winning Environmental Video!

As an organization, we need to have our say. Here then is Save The Great South Bay's plan to win the contest: We call on all members of Save The Great South Bay and supporters to our cause to submit a video of six seconds or less on the topic of water quality/ what they love about the Great South Bay/ what needs to be done to fix it (see general guidelines below) and either email them to [email protected], or post them at either our Facebook Page Save The Great South Bay, or if you are a member at our Facebook Group Page, or send them via the contact form at the bottom of this event posting as soon as you can, ideally by SEPTEMBER 12TH. The contest ends Sept 15th and we will need a couple of days beforehand to edit together all the clips into 1-3 minute videos for submission on YouTube for the contest. With over 1700 members in the group, we could crowdsource something special.

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Can Long Island Be Saved? Part X — It’s a CrapSHOOT! You Can Be Part of Save The Great South Bay’s Winning Environmental Video!

As an organization, we need to have our say. Here then is Save The Great South Bay's plan to win the contest: We call on all members of Save The Great South Bay and supporters to our cause to submit a video of six seconds or less on the topic of water quality/ what they love about the Great South Bay/ what needs to be done to fix it (see general guidelines below) and either email them to [email protected], or post them at either our Facebook Page Save The Great South Bay, or if you are a member at our Facebook Group Page, or send them via the contact form at the bottom of this event posting as soon as you can, ideally by SEPTEMBER 12TH. The contest ends Sept 15th and we will need a couple of days beforehand to edit together all the clips into 1-3 minute videos for submission on YouTube for the contest. With over 1700 members in the group, we could crowdsource something special.

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Can Long Island Be Saved? Part IX — The Following Beaches Will Be Closed This Weekend…

This what happens on Long Island in the warm months every time it rains. And it gets worse by the year. Before 1984, we did not have algal blooms around Long Island. Headlong development has caught up with us. What led us to think that we could put 500,000 septic tanks / cesspools in the low lying sand of Long Island and not suffer some consequences? That said, we had no definitive scientific link between nitrogen from our septic tanks and the explosion of algal blooms now threatening almost all our waters until 2005.

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Contact Your New York State Senators And Assemblymen Immediately — They Must Pass The Long Island Water Quality Control Act

The State Legislature is only in session for one more day up in Albany. There is only a day left to bring to the floor (and pass!) The Long Island Water Quality Control Act A.9788A/S.7804. The future of Long Island's bays, rivers and ponds depend on it. Our drinking water depends on it.

The bill establishes pollution standards for residents, businesses, and agriculture , standards we are going to need in place if we are to save our waters and build a sustainable Long Island.

There are of course certain constituencies who don't want to see this bill passed because it would force them to change how they do business -- what they can put on the ground, in the air, in the water, what they can build where, what new water quality regulations they'd need to follow.

But two things about building a sustainable Long Island :

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The Long Island Clean Water Partnership – A Roster

The mission of the partnership is to build awareness among Long Islanders as to the threats to our drinking water, our bays, rivers and ponds so that we can address these threats. The largest threat our water faces on Long Island is the nitrogen pollution in our groundwater from 500,000 septic tanks. It sparks the algal blooms that are killing off all our waters. Then there are also high nitrogen fertilizers, polluted storm runoff, pesticides. Each of these 100+ organizations, and the individuals here listed are dedicated to addressing our groundwater pollution problems before it is too late, and our lakes rivers, ponds and bays are lifeless and our drinking water compromised.

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The Suffolk County Comprehensive Water Resources Management Plan — The Anatomy of a Crisis For Long Island

So what will the county do? What will Long Island do? Clearly, it will take billions to address the septic tank issue. That's where the IBM Smarter Cities award will come in handy. Suffolk County won $500,000 worth of consulting from IBM to study the issue of sewer and waste water treatment planning. Rest assured, when it comes time to remove and replace the 100,000 septic tanks with something green, they will have a full, complete and accurate inventory, and a process. Beyond that, everyone -- the governor, our senators -- agree that we need sewer systems and modern waste water treatment technology and the funding to make that possible.

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Suing The Suffolk County Legislature For Diverting $33 Million in Water Protection Funds

It is only legal and proper that these funds be returned so that Suffolk County, including Steven Bellone's office, can focus on the enormous task of dealing with Long Island's water quality issues. With 360,000 septic tanks leeching nitrogenous waste into our ground water, billions will need to be spent on sewering and on modernizing a 19th Century infrastructure. As it stands, our drinking water is threatened, and the polluted ground water is systematically killing all our bays, ponds, and rivers by triggering massive algal blooms. The County cannot ask the public for more money -- a lot more money - on one hand while on the other taking that money out to paper over budget shortfalls. It marks a violation of public trust.

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Suffolk County Legislature Poised to Raid $33 Million From Sewage Treatment Fund. URGENT Action Required Today Before 1 PM

Incredibly, the final budget proposal includes a provision that will "sweep" some $33 million from a portion of the voter-approved Suffolk County Water Protection Program, known as the sewer Assessment Stabilization Reserve Fund (ASRF). This fund is exclusively obligated under County law to provide support for sewer improvements, sewage treatment plant upgrades and the installation of residential and commercial enhanced nitrogen removal systems - the exact kind of sewage systems that many areas need to improve water quality.

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