Tag: The Breach

8 results found

Save The Great South Bay Tours Bellport Inlet (The Breach) with The New York Times — The Overwhelming Consensus: Leave It Alone

The breach, now known as Bellport Inlet, is now broadly accepted as being a boon to The Great South Bay. No longer are there calls for its closure. It has revitalized Bellport Bay, and showed us what we lost and could yet get back

Read more

“Once More Unto The Breach, My Friends, Once More” — Please Submit Your Public Comments By Oct 8th!

The Great South Bay may getting worse in general, year by year, but not around the breach due south of Bellport. There, you will see clean water, fish, birds, seal, fish, mussel beds -- nature resurgent. The National Parks Service is obliged to offer this period of public comment as it prepares its management plan and environmental impact statement for "The Breach." So let's tell them where we stand!

Read more

The Latest Report From SOMAS and Professor Charles Flagg On The State of The Breach / New Inlet / Old Inlet On Fire Island South of Bellport Bay

This report, their tenth, available here Inlet_Report_10 in its entirety, discusses both how the breach has evolved and mutated, while remaining stable over all in terms of its flow and its influence on water quality in The Great South Bay. Bellport Bay -- and not much more than that -- continues to benefit greatly from the influx of fresh clean ocean water and the outflow of nitrogen rich, oxygen depleted water.

Read more

Will James Discusses The Breach as an An Unexpected Gift From Hurricane Sandy on The Brian Lehrer Show

Here is Will James, author of On Long Island Coast, An Unexpected Gift From Hurricane Sandy, which appeared recently in The Atlantic Magazine, on The Brian Lehrer Show 11-18-13 speaking about the breach / New Inlet on Fire Island has helped to revitalize the eastern part of the bay. He also notes that science has shown that the breach has not increased flooding in the bay.

Read more

The Atlantic Magazine: On Long Island Coast, An Unexpected Gift From Hurricane Sandy

While Will James depicts the issue of the breach / New Inlet as an ongoing conflict, with a decision in the balance, with the environmentalists pitted against the home owners, a year on post Sandy I'd have to say that the debate over the breach is pretty much over. The public has spoken. Emails, phone calls, public meetings. Many meetings with politicians and policy makers, dozens of environmental organizations working together in support of science and the case for leaving the breach alone. We stand with our flooded neighbors, and want to see them get the help they need quickly, with the money spent wisely and the work done well. At this point, the vast majority understand that spending $20 million to plug the breach would provide absolutely no protection from the next big storm.

The article's main proponent for closing the breach is Aram Terchunian, who is described in the article as "Long Island coastal geologist who has worked as a consultant on other breach-closure projects." He is also Founder and CEO of First Coastal, a firm that has made a lot of money on Long Island over the years pushing sand around. He refers to the breach as "a giant hole" must be plugged. To quote Upton Sinclair, "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" Sandy knocked Fire Island 75 feet north. It took with it 52% of Fire Island's sand. The water's coming, and spending $20 million so that a contractor fills it in (at great environmental damage to what is now by far the healthiest part of the The Great South Bay) is pure folly, and most people -- scientists and the general public -- now know that. He says "its not rocket science" to conclude filling the breach would mitigate flooding, but as he is the lone voice making the argument to close it, arrayed against a number of marine scientists with years of data at their disposal, one must ask him what kind of science he is practicing and where his data is.

Read more

New York Seagrant Weighs In On The Breach and The Crippling of The Bay Park Sewage Treatment Plant — Both Caused By Hurricane Sandy

Seagrant ( a lot more on them below, from their site), offers an overview of the two most important topics affecting The Great South Bay and the Western Bays -- The Breach / New Inlet, and The Crippling of The Bay Park Sewage Treatment Plant By Hurricane Sandy. Here is a national marine science non-profit with a strong local presence offering their views on both these issues as part of a Post Sandy assessment of marine conditions post Sandy and what our policy should be regarding them. One's a story of dirty water being flushed out (The Breach), the other a story of dirty water pouring in (The crippled Bay Park Sewage Treatment Plant). In both cases, it is crucial that as we rebuild we make wise, informed choices. As the Breach / New Inlet is flushing the Eastern Great South Bay while revitalizing it and lowering the brown algae count to perhaps 1/100th of what we are seeing in Moriches and Shinnecock Bay, we need to keep The New Inlet open -- or to put it another way, prevent it from being closed through political pressure.

Read more