Tag: The Nature Conservancy

19 results found

Poisoning The Well: What’s Wrong With The Water in East Hampton? More Than You Might Have Imagined

What makes Georgica Pond so interesting is the possibility that motivated residents, top scientists and attentive local officials could be at the forefront of reversing the symptoms of the nutrient pollution that has become an island-wide, and arguably a world-wide, problem.

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Can LI Be Saved? VIII – IBM Offers Roadmap to A Sustainable Future for LI While in Albany Its Business As Usual

As the bill in Albany died, a plan on Long Island was born. Now it is truly up to Governor Cuomo's 'task force' on Water Quality and Coastal Resiliency to hold the last of its four public meetings and offer its recommendations. Will Governor Cuomo have the vision and drive to move past the Albany nonsense to protect and restore the water sole source supply of drinking water for 3 million Long islanders, and the $5 billion dollar per year cash cow coastal economy of New York State? Will Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone step up and make the sweeping agency reforms recommended by the expert panel from IBM Smarter Cities Program? If so - then best of times indeed. Between IBM and the many dozens of experts in consultation now on water quality issues, we have the very best science in the world at hand to address our problems. We need to leverage this fact. "We have to."

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An Open Letter to Steven Bellone: Thank You For Highlighting How Long Island is Under Threat From Ground Water Polluted by Septic Tanks

We of Save The Great South Bay applaud your leadership in helping to shine a light on the major issue threatening all of Long Island's bays, rivers, ponds, its very drinking water, and with that our way of life. With the release of The Comprehensive Water Resources Management Plan, the public at large, the 1.5 million people who live in Suffolk County and the 1.35 million in Nassau County, can begin to understand the collective threat we face from nitrogenous waste in our groundwater.

The public release of the report was truly a watershed moment. It was also a call to action. The now over 1100 members of Save The Great South Bay are ready to do their part to raise awareness about the threats our waters face, and to seek, in partnership with local officials and other environmental non-profits, solutions that would help preserve Long Island as a desirable place to live for our children and grandchildren.

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Long Island’s Drinking Water: Threats and Solutions – A Presentation From The Long Island Clean Water Partnership

Two of the charter members of The Long Island Clean Water Partnership, The Citizen’s Campaign For The Environment, and The Group For The East End, offer this overview of the state of Long Island’s waters — what is polluting them and what we can do about it.

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Volunteer To Seed The Great South Bay With Clams

Volunteers should be prepared to lift upwards of 40-60 lbs repeatedly and be prepared to do so on the water as well. We can provide waterproof gear but volunteers should be prepared with warm clothes as it is often much colder on the water. A snack, water, and potentially lunch is a good idea as well. A typical day of stocking can run from 10-2 but may end up to an hour earlier or later depending on availability of spawner clams.

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Breach Report 9-19-13: WSJ On The Breach: “The Kindest Cut of All”

Fishermen and scientists report cleaner water and more marine life in the Great South Bay since superstorm Sandy blasted a new inlet across Fire Island, the slender land barrier that separates the Long Island bay from the Atlantic Ocean.

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News12 to Air FIve Part Series on Long Island Water Quality — What’s In The Water (Sept 23rd through 27th)

This series -- which runs from Monday the 23rd of September to Friday the 27th with a one hour live special Thursday the 26th 7-8 -- is an admirable effort on the part of News12 and its President Pat Dolan, as well as all the scientists within The Long Island Clean Water Partnership and others to bring to light the challenges we face collectively as Long Islanders when it comes to assuring our water quality and our way of life for future generations. The problems are immense, but the solutions are there, if we decide, together on this island we call home, to take action. Our children and grandchild should also fish, swim, clam, and sail as we had, and Long Island should remain a place where people raise their families knowing the water is safe to drink and the environment is a healthy one. News12 understands the urgency, as does the 125+ organizations that make up The Long Island Partnership for Clean Water.

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The Long Island Clean Water Partnership Announced / What You Can Do

As New York continues to recover from Sandy and rebuilds, we are now also faced with a Long Island that is rapidly becoming unlivable due to nitrogenous waste in the ground water, the 117 pesticides in our drinking water, and the pharmaceuticals we throw away or flush down the toilet. The nitrogenous waste is from septic tanks and from lawn fertilizers, from the over 195 small sewage treatment plants scattered across the island, and from antiquated or crippled sewage treatment plants like the one in Bay Park, damaged severely by Sandy.

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How Can I Help Save Long Island’s Waters?

Start using lawn and agricultural fertilizers that are eco-friendly, that don't pollute our groundwater, drinking water and bays with excess nitrogen and phosphorus. The excess nitrogen has been contributing to brown tide, red tide, rust tide, red tide and blue green algae, and these have been killing our bays and in some cases rendering the water toxic. Click here to see what Nitrogen Free recommends for lawn care as they work to support Save Barnegat Bay. What ever bay we are speaking of, on Long Island or not, the issues are the same -- too much nitrogen in the groundwater from fertilizer and septic seepage leading to algal blooms and dying bays.

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Breach Report 08-07-13 : CBS News Reports “Mounting Debate,” Features County Legislator vs. Almost Everyone Else

It has become the reflexive habit of news organizations to frame every news item as a conflict, a controversy. Without that, there is no story. You could be in a lecture hall for two and a half hours, listen to a panel, then have public statements from a crowd of 600. The one person who stands up to say that the breach must be closed because his apartment complex was flooded this winter is the person how gets surrounded by microphones. That's exactly what happened in March at a Town Hall in Bellport about The New Inlet. Nearly unanimous support after 2 1/2 hours, but I had reporters actually say to me, 'where's the conflict/story in that?' When we wade into public policy debates, where the science most matters, it is truly corrosive to science and civic life to see this happen.

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