Great South Bay Oyster Project

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Habitat Restoration

Oyster Project Logo - Great South Bay

Habitat Restoration

Oysters eat murky water for lunch. If we bring them back in volume, they’ll clean the bay better and faster than any human can.

We advocate for healing the creeks that feed our bay, for bay-friendly yards, for helping to return a shellfishing industry to the Great South Bay, and for the deployment of modern wastewater treatment technologies to address the problems caused by 500,000 cesspools and septic tanks, as well as the 197 large scale septic systems in malls, apartment complexes and locally.

Volunteer 

Lend a hand! Join our Oyster Project Team and help revive The Great South Bay.

Partnering With Oyster Growers

Save The Great South Bay works closely with oyster growers on The South Shore. We seek to implement new techniques for the reintroduction of oysters such as we see being undertaken in The Chesapeake, or through New York City’s Billion Oyster Project, or closer to home, with Friends of Bellport Bay. Given the value of oysters today, there is also a lot of innovation around how best to grow them.

Of course, nothing happens without cleaner water. That is why getting rid of our cesspools and septic tanks, healing our creeks, tackling runoff, and practicing natural lawn care is so important.

Please contact us with any suggestions you may have. You can also donate our efforts. We want to apply the latest techniques in aquaculture to revitalize our bay, our economy and our local culture.

We advocate for healing the creeks that feed our bay, for bay-friendly yards, for helping to return a shell fishing industry to the Great South Bay, and for the deployment of modern wastewater treatment technologies to address the problems caused by 500,000 cesspools and septic tanks, as well as the 197 large scale septic systems in malls, apartment complexes and locally.

The Making Of An Oyster Sanctuary

Part One Of Three
Site Evaluation
Part Two Of Three
Establishing the Sanctuary
Part Three Of Three
Enhancing and Measuring for Success

Recent Progress On Habitat Restoration

Here’s what we’ve recently been up to. Your participation could look like one of these updates, or – if you can’t dive in there and get dirty yourself, just support the project and we’ll find a way to do it. Everyone has a part in this shared cause.
NYS Freshwater Wetlands Act Due for a Makeover

NYS Freshwater Wetlands Act Due for a Makeover

Save The Great South Bay, 501(c)3 is a proud signatory on the letter below urging leadership to protect our remaining wetlands and enact strong reforms to New York State's Freshwater Wetlands Act in the One House Budget Proposals. The letter was written and submitted...

Brown’s River Upland Spoils Disposal Sites

Brown’s River Upland Spoils Disposal Sites

February 4, 2022 Dear County Executive Bellone, Thank you for agreeing to a strategic pause to the construction of a dredge spoil dewatering facility to allow for better public input into the site selection process. As you are aware, we are opposed to the planned...

Coastal Changes, Coastal Choices

Coastal Changes, Coastal Choices

On this episode of Water Matters, we are joined by Kevin McAllister of Defend H2O to discuss how physical coastal changes are influenced by climate change, how policy can protect our coastal resources, and what this all means for the Great South Bay and Long Island as...

Mugwort Removal at Native Species Sanctuary

Mugwort Removal at Native Species Sanctuary

What a great way to show our thankfulness this past weekend as Save The Great South Bay teamed up with the South Shore Audubon Society to remove invasive species at the Michael J. Sperling Bird Sanctuary in North Massapequa. Under the direction of the ecological...

A Swell App To Measure Debris

A Swell App To Measure Debris

Want to help us collect data on debris? There's an app for that. The Clean Swell app. At Save The Great South Bay, we are firm believers in the age old adage of you can't manage what you can't measure. Starting in 2021 and in collaboration with the Ocean Conservancy,...

Jet Skis Can Damage Marshlands

Jet Skis Can Damage Marshlands

Jet skis (personal water craft) are a lot of fun, and we love having fun on the Great South Bay, but full throttle jet ski riding in the marshlands can do some real harm to nature. Marsh sidewalls are sensitive and the propulsion from jet ski's can cause them to...